VIDEO: “I’m still trying to find my way back home”

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DVNF's Health & Comfort program provides veterans with vital necessities, like clothing, personal care items, and health and hygiene supplies, but it also provides something else - hope. Maurice told us that he served in Vietnam, "deep in the jungle," as he said, from 1969-1970. It's truly unbelievable the amount of hell one person can experience in just 13 short months. Maurice's voice begins to fade a bit as he confesses that this single year of his life has impacted him since then. "I'm still trying to find my way back home." This quote is a brutal reality, and the horrors of war our men and women face aren't limited to their combat experience. The trauma they face often lasts for years, just like Maurice. PTSD affects the mind, body and spirit of veterans, and can be so difficult to

A Glimpse Inside the Profession of Equine Therapy: Horse and Human Roles

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What makes an Equine Assisted Horse Professional? What special knowledge or skill might they need to have in order to do this work?  An equine-assisted professional should have a grounding in basic horse care requirements: feeding and nutrition, grooming, de-worming, vaccination, farrier needs, and monitoring vitals and general health. He/She should know the signs of colic, lameness, and other issues. He/She should be competent in handling the horse and maintaining a sound facility and environment suitable for horses. I feel it’s pretty important for every equine-assisted professional to take a step back from anything and everything they’ve ever learned about horses, and re-evaluate its completeness. Ideally, each horse professional develops a never-ending “learner’s mind” toward horses, a mindset that always questions the traditional ways while exploring and examining new ones. What Does It take to Be an Equine-Assisted Professional? The

WATCH: Veteran Discusses His Experience with PTSD and Drinking

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PTSD and Drinking Can Send Life into a Tailspin Drinking is a common activity that is usually ingrained in the military experience. But what happens when drinking is used as a self-medicating coping mechanism? Things can spiral out of control in a hurry. Just listen to this Marine veteran's experience with drinking. When I drank, got drunk, you know, all the anxiety, depression, my purpose, the betrayal - all that, it went out the window ... For the next 3 years I was drunk probably - drunk or hung over 75 percent of the time. So when I went out I couldn't just have one ... and that caused problems. For veterans struggling with PTSD, drinking might feel like a temporary solution to what you're going through. Unfortunately, it isn't a solution at all. If drinking has become a problem for you,