Tools to Maximize Independence for Disabled Veterans

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For disabled veterans, simple tasks can get in the way of everyday activities. Not being able to put on your shoes, type on a computer or get down your front steps can make the difference between leading a fulfilling, independent life and feeling distraught and helpless. Know that having an impairment doesn’t mean you have to struggle with your day-to-day life. Assistive device options The purpose of assistive aids is to help maintain or improve your functioning and independence. They can enrich your physical, mental or intellectual wellbeing. In short, these tools make it easier for you to do everyday activities, such as getting dressed, moving around or cooking. Independent living aids This is a sample of the devices that can help you stay independent in your home. Consider these choices: In the kitchen: Mechanical reaching tools: Ask someone to

WATCH: Veteran Discusses His Experience with PTSD and Drinking

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PTSD and Drinking Can Send Life into a Tailspin Drinking is a common activity that is usually ingrained in the military experience. But what happens when drinking is used as a self-medicating coping mechanism? Things can spiral out of control in a hurry. Just listen to this Marine veteran's experience with drinking. When I drank, got drunk, you know, all the anxiety, depression, my purpose, the betrayal - all that, it went out the window ... For the next 3 years I was drunk probably - drunk or hung over 75 percent of the time. So when I went out I couldn't just have one ... and that caused problems. For veterans struggling with PTSD, drinking might feel like a temporary solution to what you're going through. Unfortunately, it isn't a solution at all. If drinking has become a problem for you,