Hurricane Harvey Disaster Relief

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Hurricane Harvey Disaster Relief Help veterans, their families, and those in critical need You’ve undoubtedly seen the unprecedented flooding that’s taking place in Houston and throughout southeast Texas. It’s hard to even imagine such devastation, and it’s going to be a long road ahead for this region. This area of Texas not only hosts the country’s fourth largest city, it also has over 500,000 veterans. Harvey’s devastation to the lives of so many people will take a nationwide effort by all of us to help get these citizens back on their feet. At DVNF, we are going to do just that. You can support veterans, their families, and those in critical need in this region right now when you give to DVNF. We have several program partners down in this area, and we are actively working to identify key areas we can

DVNF’s Mid-Year Program Report

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How DVNF Programs have helped our veterans in 2017 Health & Comfort One of the most difficult things for us to do as a nonprofit is celebrate accomplishments, knowing there are so many more veterans in need of help. However, it is important to measure the impact of our programs. One such program DVNF has is the Health & Comfort program, by which we send critically-needed items like clothing, toiletries, and other vital goods to homeless and low-income veterans at stand down events and shelters. This program has already reached veterans in communities up and down the United States so far in 2017. So far this year, we’ve sent 11 Health & Comfort shipments! Thousands of veterans now have clothing they may not have been able to afford, a new suit to help them land a job, or even something as

Guest Blog: Hidden Pain

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By: Ana Yelen, Healing Warriors Program When we first launched Healing Warriors Program, one of our staunchest supporters, told us the reason our program was so important for her.  This woman, a teacher, mentor and medical professional, shared with us a story she had been unable to share in over 30 years: the anguish of her dad’s death, over what they called shell-shock and we call PTSD, quietly trickled out.  It was a heart-wrenching story, made even more tragic by the fact that thirty years later, we continue to lose veterans at alarming rates because of pain and post traumatic stress. But the problem is complex and finds expression in a multitude of ways, from the homeless veterans living day to day, to the veteran who has transitioned back to civilian life and is seemingly reintegrated into their prior life.